Sociology

Sociology is the study of social life and focuses on the interaction between human groups and institutions and their influences on each other. Sociology ranges from the study of relationships in family units in non-western cultures to the research of large bureaucratic institutions in major industrialized nations. Among the specialties within sociology are race relations, cultural traditions, demography, family relations, social psychology, gerontology, criminology, social welfare, education, social status and social change. 

101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Sociology 101 is an introduction to sociology, its methods and resources. The course focuses on the following areas: society and culture, personality organization, social interaction and social processes, human groups and collective behavior, role and status, class and stratification, ethnic and other inter group relations, ecology and urban sociology, population and social change.

102 SOCIAL CRISES OF TODAY
Sociology 102 develops a definition and criteria of social crises. The course examines social problems within the context of culture and economics. Selected social issues such as crime, ethnic tensions, poverty, work, youth, the changing nature and role of the family, homelessness, and related urban issues are addressed within functional and conflict theoretical frameworks.

103 INTRODUCTION TO DEVIANCE AND CRIMINOLOGY
Sociology 103 examines the sources, causes, and extent of violations of society's behavioral norms and laws. Using classical and contemporary sociological theories on deviance and crime, the course will analyze the interaction between individuals, groups, and various aspects of social control, including the criminal justice system. Classification of crimes, statistical data on their frequencies, and societal responses, both formal and informal, will be investigated.

104 SOCIOLOGY OF SEX AND GENDER
Sociology 104 is a survey course that explores biological, anthropological, psychological, and sociological perspectives of sex and gender roles in American society and various other societies, such as Sweden, Russia, China, India, and so on. Focusing on power relations, the course uses a sociological and psychological approach to analyze sex and gender roles in major social institutions: Family, education, mass media, religion, work, law, political or economic structures, and medical systems.

105 INTRODUCTION TO GERONTOLOGY
Sociology 105 is an introduction to the study of social gerontology, aging and its implications for the individual and society utilizing a multidisciplinary approach. Lecture 3 hours.

131 MARRIAGE AND INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS
Sociology 131 studies, with an emphasis on psychological and sociological theories and research, the development of traditional and contemporary patterns of people living together. Topics examined include the historical development of marriage, diverse lifestyles (including single-parenting, the blended family, and gay and lesbian partnerships), partner compatibility, communication techniques, intimacy, conflict, child-rearing, dissolution of partnerships, and speculation about the future of relationships.

140 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WELFARE
Sociology 140 is an introduction to social welfare and social work. It provides an analysis of current functions and purpose of social welfare as an institution. Knowledge, values and skills underpinning social work practice are introduced in this course.