Philosophy

Philosophy is considered a branch of the language arts and involves the study of the truths or principles underlying all knowledge. Philosophical study involves a continuous attempt to analyze, interpret, and logically explain what humans believe, value, and do. While occupations are generally only indirectly linked to the study of philosophy, a number of other disciplines, avocations and leisure time activities offer additional attractions for the interested student. Among the major sub-branches are metaphysics, logic and axiology.

101 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
Philosophy 101 is an overview of the classical and modern problems of philosophy. A consideration of the nature of knowledge, views of the cosmos or world, and the problems of truth, beauty, ethics, and theology.

112 HUMAN VALUES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
Philosophy 112 is a study of human attitudes toward the physical world and the biological organisms within it. Topics covered will be the definition of values, a study of historical viewpoints, and a brief assessment of the consequences of such attitudes in creating and/or solving environmental problems.

113 COMPARATIVE WORLD RELIGIONS: NEAR EAST
Philosophy 113 is a comparative study of the salient ideas and philosophical developments in Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and primitive and national religions of the past.

114 COMPARATIVE WORLD RELIGIONS: FAR EAST
Philosophy 114 is a comparative study of the salient ideas and philosophical developments in Hinduism, Buddhism, other Indian religions, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto.

116 ETHICS FOR MODERN LIFE
Philosophy 116 is an analysis of the concept of the good, the scope of morality, the deterministic controversy, the ethical yardsticks, and the major ethical systems and their roots. Attention is given to contemporary positivism, John Dewey, Marxist ethics, authority as an ethical principle, intuitionism, egoistic hedonism, utilitarianism, ethical idealism, Immanuel Kant, modern Aristotelianism, and existentialism and recent ethical theories.

117 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC
Philosophy 117 is a study of the structure and function of language, inductive and deductive forms of reasoning and argumentation. Includes the study of formal argumentation, the methods of experimental inquiry, the nature of scientific hypothesis, and probability theory.

118 WOMEN, THE EARTH, AND THE DIVINE
Philosophy 118 introduces students to the relationship between social domination of women and domination of the rest of nature. The goal of this course is to help students develop skills in analyzing the impact of the world's major religions on the lives of women in both the majority and minority cultures and on the life of the planet earth.

119 HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY: ANCIENT PERIOD
Philosophy 119 is a critical study of the philosophic systems and ideas of the Western civilization from the ancient Greeks to the end of the Medieval period, with special emphasis on the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Roman philosophical thinkers, and the impact of Christian thought on Western culture.

120 HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY: MODERN PERIOD
Philosophy 120 is a critical study of the philosophic systems and ideas of the modern period which have had a dominant impact on Western civilization, with special emphasis on Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, twentieth century British and American philosophers.

121 ISLAM: A WAY OF LIFE
Philosophy 121 is a study of Islam as both a religion and a culture. The study of the religion includes a consideration of beliefs and practices of the faith, and the history of the man, Muhammad, who revealed the faith. The study of the culture includes a consideration of the early successors to Muhammad, religious movements and sects, philosophy, science, and political power.

122 LATIN AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY
Philosophy 122 is the study of the various forms which philosophy has taken in Latin America. The course examines the background of Inca, Aztec, and European thought patterns. It emphasizes philosophy of civilization and philosophy of art, including the contributions of the Mexican muralist. Representative viewpoints, such as scholasticism, romanticism, and evolutionism are described.

123 INTRODUCTION TO SYMBOLIC LOGIC
Philosophy 123 introduces students to the calculus of propositional and predicate logic to enable students to formally evaluate arguments. Students will learn to translate English arguments, use truth tables, create natural deduction derivations, use defined identity relations, acquire a precise understanding of soundness and validity, and to begin to develop a working grasp on logic meta theory.